Legal Resources

There are times when renters cannot resolve conflicts with their landlords on their own or need additional support and advice. Several city agencies and community organizations exist to advocate for and support the rights of renters in Philadelphia. Depending on what issues you are experiencing in your off-campus living situation, contacting one or more of these resources could help you become a more informed renter and assist you with your tenant/landlord dispute.

Community Legal Services

Community Legal Services of Philadelphia provides affordable legal counsel to help low-income Philadelphia residents obtain equal access to justice and representation in legal matters. This organization also advocates for tenants’ legal rights and conducts community education about legal issues that can affect local renters.

1424 Chestnut St.
Philadelphia, PA 19102

Department of Licenses and Inspections

The Department of License and Inspections (L&I) is a city agency that coordinates all licensing and inspections for the City of Philadelphia, including the application process to receive a rental license and building safety inspections.

Municipal Services Building (Main Office)
1401 John F. Kennedy Building, 11th floor
Philadelphia, PA 19102

Fair Housing Commission

The Fair Housing Commission is a city agency that primarily handles complaints concerning unfair rental practices and issues pertaining to discrimination.

601 Walnut Street
Suite 300 South
Philadelphia, PA 19106
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Tenant Union Representative Network

The Tenant Union Representative Network (TURN) is a non-profit organization that offers a variety of housing-related services including tenants’ rights workshops and legal counseling.  
21 South 12th Street, Suite 1100
Philadelphia, PA 19107
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Court Procedures

If you have failed to resolve your landlord tenant problems by properly communicating with your landlord, putting your requests in writing, documenting the condition of the unit, giving the landlord a reasonable amount of time to respond and correct the defect, or if the landlord finds you in breach of lease, both you and the landlord can take the matter to court. In the City of Philadelphia, tenant/landlord matters are brought before the Small Claims Court.

The following links, provided by The Philadelphia Courts, offer information on how to start a Landlord-Tenant Case and a Small Claims Case.